Russia, brushing off Obama, looks to friendlier Donald Trump

President-elect Donald Trump speaks to reporters at Mar-a-Lago, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
FILE _ In this Monday, Dec. 26, 2016 file photo Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the meeting in St.Petersburg, Russia. President Vladimir Putin said, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016 that Russia will not be expelling US diplomats in response to a new round of US sanctions. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, File)
FILE _ In this Monday, Dec. 26, 2016 file photo Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the meeting in St.Petersburg, Russia. President Vladimir Putin said, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016 that Russia will not be expelling US diplomats in response to a new round of US sanctions. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, File)
Latvian President Raimonds Vejonis, right, looks at US Sen. John McCain centre left, during a press conference, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016 in Riga, Latvia, while Lindsey Graham, R-SC., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., stand in the background. Russia can expect hard-hitting sanctions from United States lawmakers if an investigation proves that Moscow interfered in the presidential election, a U.S. senator said Wednesday during a visit to Latvia. (AP Photo/Vitnija Saldava)
This image provided by the FBI shows the wanted poster for Evgeniy Bogachev. In a sweeping response to election hacking, President Barack Obama sanctioned Russian intelligence services and their top officials, kicked out 35 Russian officials and shuttered two Russian-owned compounds in the U.S. It was the strongest action the Obama administration has taken to date to retaliate for a cyberattack. Other individuals sanctioned include Bogachev and Alexey Belan, two Russian nationals who have been wanted by the FBI for cyber crimes for years. (FBI via AP)
In this photo taken Dec. 16, 2016, President Barack Obama speaks during a news conference in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama has imposed sanctions on Russian officials and intelligence services in retaliation for Russia's interference in the U.S. presidential election by hacking American political sites and email accounts. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
The U.S. Embassy with its national flag, see behind a monument to the Workers of 1905 Revolution in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016. President Vladimir Putin said, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016 that Russia will not be expelling US diplomats in response to a new round of US sanctions. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a sword while listening an explanations from the head of Russian First Channel Konstantin Ernst, during his meeting with the historical action film Viking's crew, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016. Viking is a historical action film based on the historical document Primary Chronicle and Icelandic Kings' sagas. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
This image provided by the FBI shows the wanted poster for Alexsey Belan. In a sweeping response to election hacking, President Barack Obama sanctioned Russian intelligence services and their top officials, kicked out 35 Russian officials and shuttered two Russian-owned compounds in the U.S. It was the strongest action the Obama administration has taken to date to retaliate for a cyberattack. Other individuals sanctioned include Belan and Evgeniy Bogachev, two Russian nationals who have been wanted by the FBI for cyber crimes for years. (FBI via AP)

HONOLULU — Stung by new punishments, Russia is looking straight past President Barack Obama to Donald Trump in hopes the president-elect will reverse the tough U.S. stance toward Moscow of the last eight years. In a stunning embrace of a longtime U.S. adversary, Trump is siding with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Whether Trump steers the U.S. toward or away from Russia upon taking office is shaping up as the first major test of his foreign policy disposition and his willingness to buck fellow Republicans, who for years have argued Obama wasn't tough enough. Now that Obama has finally sanctioned Russia over hacking allegations, Putin has essentially put relations on hold till Trump takes over.

"Great move on delay (by V. Putin)," Trump wrote Friday on Twitter. "I always knew he was very smart!"

He was referring to Putin's announcement that Russia won't immediately retaliate after Obama ordered sanctions on Russian spy agencies, closed two Russian compounds and expelled 35 diplomats the U.S. said were really spies. Though Putin reserved the right to hit back later, he suggested that won't be necessary with Trump in office.

Brushing off Obama, Putin said Russia would plan steps to restore U.S. ties "based on the policies that will be carried out by the administration of President D. Trump." Not only would Russia not kick Americans out, Putin said, he was inviting the kids of all U.S. diplomats to the Kremlin's New Year's and Christmas parties.

"At this point, they're trolling Obama," said Olga Oliker, who directs the Russia program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

The Obama administration said it had seen Putin's remarks but had nothing more to say.

Trump's move to side with a foreign adversary over the sitting U.S. president was a striking departure from typical diplomatic practice. In a sign he wanted maximum publicity, Trump pinned the tweet to the top of his Twitter page so it would remain there indefinitely.

Russia denies the U.S. intelligence community's assessment that in an attempt to help Trump win the presidency, Moscow orchestrated cyber breaches in which tens of thousands of Democrats' emails were stolen and later made public. Trump, too, has refused to accept that conclusion and insisted the country should just "move on," though he has agreed to meet next week with intelligence leaders to learn more.

Notably, after the U.S. on Thursday issued a report it said exposed Russia's cyber tactics, Putin's aides didn't offer any specific rebuttal. The report included detailed technical information like IP addresses and samples of malware code the U.S. said Russia uses.

One utility company, Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, reported Friday that it had detected the malware on a company laptop that was not connected to its grid systems. Burlington said, "We took immediate action to isolate the laptop and alerted federal officials of this finding."

There's little certainty about how Trump will actually act on Russia once he takes office Jan. 20. Though he's praised Putin as a strong leader and said it would be ideal for the two countries to stop fighting, he also suggested this month the U.S. might mount a new nuclear arms race, triggering fresh anxieties about a return to Cold War-style tensions.

Ambassador Michael McFaul, Obama's former envoy to Russia, said while Trump has defined his top objective as "getting along with the Kremlin," Putin has higher goals, including the lifting of economic sanctions and, ideally, U.S. recognition of Russia's annexation of Crimea.

"Obviously, Putin's not responding because he's waiting for Jan. 20," McFaul said in an interview. "He's got these much more important objectives to him than getting into a tit-for-tat response with the outgoing administration."

Trump's warm outreach to Putin, combined with picks for secretary of state and national security adviser who are seen as friendly to Russia, have left hawkish Republicans with a particularly unpleasant choice: look hypocritical for backtracking on their own tough talk, or risk a public rift with their party's new president.

In the House, many Republicans who have long called for tougher sanctions have been silent or vague about Obama's penalties and Trump's positions. But a handful of GOP senators have shown they have no intentions of letting up pressure on the Kremlin.

"We intend to lead the effort in the new Congress to impose stronger sanctions on Russia," said Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee, scheduled a hearing next week on "foreign cyber threats" in an attempt to further spotlight Russia's actions.

Even if Trump opts to pull back Obama's sanctions and overlook hacking allegations, he may find rapprochement with Russia isn't that simple. The past two presidents both tried to reach out to Russia early in their terms but left office with relations in no better shape.

Though Trump has suggested the U.S. and Russia should align strategies in Syria by focusing on their mutual enemy, the Islamic State group, Russia's military campaign has almost exclusively targeted American-backed Syrian rebels, the U.S. has said. Nor is it clear whether Trump and Putin share a common approach to Europe's security issues.

And if Trump follows through on his vow to renegotiate the Iran nuclear deal, he won't find a receptive audience in Moscow. Putin's government brokered the deal with the U.S., Iran and other world powers and has no intention of slapping sanctions back on Iran.

___

Associated Press writers Nataliya Vasilyeva and Jim Heintz in Moscow and Lynn Berry in Washington contributed to this report.

___

Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP

Must Read

FBI head: Clinton email matter 'not a...

Sep 8, 2016

FBI Director James Comey has told his colleagues that the decision to not recommend charges against...

Apple is betting big on a wireless world

Sep 8, 2016

Apple wants to push consumers further into a wireless world

AP FACT CHECK: Multiple missteps mark Trump,...

Sep 8, 2016

Republican Donald Trump repeated a bevy of previous misstatements in a forum on national security...

US regulators: Official recall of 1M Samsung Note...

Sep 16, 2016

U.S. regulators are issuing an official recall of Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 phone because of the risk...

Russia, brushing off Obama, looks to friendlier...

Dec 31, 2016

Stung by new punishments, Russia is looking straight past President Barack Obama to Donald Trump in...

About Us

The World Insiders brings you exclusive coverage from across the globe in a timely, easy to consume format sourced directly from our regional media partners.

Contact us: sales[at]theworldinsiders.com

Subscribe Now!